Aims and Scope

The Open Agriculture Journal is an Open Access online journal, which publishes research articles, reviews/mini-reviews and letters in all areas of agricultural science. Topics covered include, agronomy; plant and animal breeding; genetics; agricultural biotechnology; crop physiology and agroecology; soil science and agroclimatology; agricultural economics and rural sociology; and sustainable systems. Agricultural biotechnology (including tissue culture, molecular markers, molecular diagnostics, vaccines, genetic engineering, genome editing as well as synthetic biology) to modify living organisms: microorganisms, fungi, plants and animals).


The scope of the journal includes but is not limited to:

  • Crop protection and Cultivation
  • Animal Science and Aquaculture
  • Pharmacognosy and Pharmaceutical Development
  • Environmental implications of agricultural land
  • Horticulture
  • Forestry
  • Agricultural Sciences, including Genetics and Agricultural Biotechnology
  • Environmental Sciences, including prevention and correction of adverse environmental effects (e.g., soil degradation, waste management, bioremediation)


Recent Articles

In Vitro Antagonistic Activity of Diverse Bacillus Species Against Fusarium culmorum and F. solani Pathogens

M. Harba, M. Jawhar, M.I.E. Arabi

Background:

Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium solani are economically important fungal pathogens of many plant species causing significant yield losses worldwide. Frequent uses of fungicides are hazardous to humans and the environment. Therefore, in vitro antagonistic activity of diverse Bacillus species isolates with biological potential activity to control these both pathogens should be investigated.

Objective:

The objectives were to isolate and identify the Bacillus spp., which are potential controls of F. culmorum and F. solani, and to characterize molecularly, at the species level, those isolates that have potential as biocontroller of the pathogens.

Methods:

The in vitro antagonistic potential of 40 Bacillus isolates against F. culmorum and F. solani was evaluated on the basis of fungal growth inhibition on nutrient broth culture. The colony morphology and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing of Bacillus spp. were used to identify the isolates.

Results:

Bacillus sp. isolates were identified as B. atrophaeus, B. subtilis, Paenibacillus polymxa, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. simplex and B. tequilensis. They had significant (P<0.05) antagonistic activities against F. culmorum and F. solani isolates as compared to the untreated control. The antagonistic effects varied depending on the Fusarium sp. The bacterial B. subtilis isolates SY116C and SY SY118C provided the most noteworthy result as both strongly inhibited mycelial growth of F. solani by 97.2%, while the B. tequilensis isolate SY145D was the most effective in the formation of inhibition zones against F. culmorum by 75%.

Conclusion:

It is apparent that Bacillus sp. isolates play an important role in the inhibition of growth of F. culmorum and F. solani, and that the B. subtilis isolates SY116C and SY118C had the highest biological potential activity against these fungi. These antagonistic effects may be important contributors as a biocontrol approach that could be employed as a part of integrated soil pathogen management system.


September 22, 2020
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Recent Articles

In Vitro Antagonistic Activity of Diverse Bacillus Species Against Fusarium culmorum and F. solani Pathogens

M. Harba, M. Jawhar, M.I.E. Arabi

Background:

Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium solani are economically important fungal pathogens of many plant species causing significant yield losses worldwide. Frequent uses of fungicides are hazardous to humans and the environment. Therefore, in vitro antagonistic activity of diverse Bacillus species isolates with biological potential activity to control these both pathogens should be investigated.

Objective:

The objectives were to isolate and identify the Bacillus spp., which are potential controls of F. culmorum and F. solani, and to characterize molecularly, at the species level, those isolates that have potential as biocontroller of the pathogens.

Methods:

The in vitro antagonistic potential of 40 Bacillus isolates against F. culmorum and F. solani was evaluated on the basis of fungal growth inhibition on nutrient broth culture. The colony morphology and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing of Bacillus spp. were used to identify the isolates.

Results:

Bacillus sp. isolates were identified as B. atrophaeus, B. subtilis, Paenibacillus polymxa, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. simplex and B. tequilensis. They had significant (P<0.05) antagonistic activities against F. culmorum and F. solani isolates as compared to the untreated control. The antagonistic effects varied depending on the Fusarium sp. The bacterial B. subtilis isolates SY116C and SY SY118C provided the most noteworthy result as both strongly inhibited mycelial growth of F. solani by 97.2%, while the B. tequilensis isolate SY145D was the most effective in the formation of inhibition zones against F. culmorum by 75%.

Conclusion:

It is apparent that Bacillus sp. isolates play an important role in the inhibition of growth of F. culmorum and F. solani, and that the B. subtilis isolates SY116C and SY118C had the highest biological potential activity against these fungi. These antagonistic effects may be important contributors as a biocontrol approach that could be employed as a part of integrated soil pathogen management system.


September 22, 2020
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Editor's Choice

Induction of Bacterial Canker Resistance in Tomato Plants Using Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria

Yuliya Kolomiiets, Ivan Grygoryuk, Artur Likhanov, Lyudmila Butsenko, Yaroslav Blume

Background:

By inducing the production of inhibitory allelochemicals and mechanisms of systemic resistance Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria (PGPB) help plants to cope with stresses.

Materials and Methods:

In this study cell suspensions of Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens or Azotobacter chroococcum were used to test the efficacy of these PGPB in inducing resistance in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) against Clavibacter michiganensis subsp michiganensis, a bacteria known to cause canker disease. To test this hypothesis, seedlings of Chaika variety, characterized by short growing, early-ripening, high productivity and resistance against fusarium and the C. michiganensis strain ІZ-38 isolated in Kyiv were employed.

Results and Conclusion:

The use of cell suspensions of the PGPB B. subtilis, A. chroococcum or P. fluorescens induced an increment in the resistance of tomato plants against the causative agent of bacterial canker (C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis) by 42–50%. PGPB in fact promoted in C. michiganensis infected tomato plants: i) the accumulation of chlorophyll a and b and carotenoids; ii) the thickening of the upper and lower epidermis of leaves; iii) the deposition of biopolymers with protective properties in epidermal cells; iv) the activity of the peroxidase enzyme and v) the net productivity of photosynthesis.


December 31, 2019
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